Hayden Henderson

Environmental Observing Systems Engineer

CIGLR UM-SEAS
4840 South State Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48108

My research occurs at an intersection of engineering and the way in which we observe changing ecosystems. Deployment of advanced observing systems, including real-time sensor networks and other oceanographic technology, is necessary for support and validation of operational forecasting, early warning systems, and other developmental research used in the physical, biological, and chemical understanding of Great Lakes and coastal systems. The products made possible by these technologies aim to provide managers, public, and education sectors with the dense amount of information needed to understand Great Lakes dynamacies – all of which have implications for public safety, recreation, and further scientific study.
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Education:
  • M.S., Michigan Technological University, 2019
  • B.S., Michigan Technological University, 2016
Research Interest/Area of Expertise:
  • Limnology/Oceanography
  • Sensor Technology and Integration
  • Autonomous Vehicles
  • Surface Water Modeling
Credentials/Service/Accomplishments
  • Merchant Mariner Credential

  • USCG Master Captain 100 GRT Great Lakes & Inland License

  • Regional Data Management Team Member: We aim to integrate NOAA OAR/IOOS data management practices into the Great Lakes

  • NOAA GLERL Data Management Committee Member: We aim to optimize data access and handling across NOAA GLERL branches and CIGLR partners

Photo Gallery
Video Library

Buoys aren’t the only thing collecting data while floating through Great Lakes waters. Researchers also use robotic underwater gliders that travel for miles to collect data on organic matter, conductivity, oxygen content, and more, sometimes staying out for three months! The Great Lakes Observing System just purchased a brand new Slocum G3 glider, and our partners at the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research have been hard at work getting it prepped for its first mission. Watch as Russ and Hayden “unbox” the glider and explain what this amazing device is capable of.

Video Library

Buffalo Reef is a natural cobble feature in Lake Superior, located off the eastern edge of the Keweenaw Peninsula in Michigan’s U.P. The reef has historically maintained invaluable spawning habitat for fish such as lake trout & lake whitefish. These habitat features are threatened by migrating stamp sands, produced by harmful mining activities from the late 1800’s. Today’s challenge involving Tribal, State, Federal, & Academic partnerships combine efforts to mitigate damages & restore Buffalo Reef as the ecological resource that has sustained both tribal & non-tribal communities for generations.

Video Library

How does climate variability impact freshwater systems? Michigan Technological University’s Marine Engineering and Technology Research team adapted high-frequency radar to better understand the hydrodynamics of the Great Lakes, impacting shipping, water quality and maritime safety.
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